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Artemether

Artemisinin (pronounced ) is a drug used to treat multi-drug resistant strains of falciparum malaria. The compound (a sesquiterpene lactone) is isolated from the shrub Artemisia annua long used in traditional Chinese medicine. Not all shrubs of this species contain artemisinin. Apparently it is only produced when the plant is subjected to certain conditions, most likely biotic or abiotic stress. It can be synthesized from artemisinic acid.

- Arteether
- Amodiaquine
- Amodiaquine Hydrochloride
- Amodiaquine
- Quinine Sulphate
- Quinine Hydrochloride
- Quinine Anhydrous
- Primaquine
- Piperazine
- Piperzine Phosphate
- Yohimbine Extract
- 10-Deacetyl Baccatin
- Hyoscine Hydro Bromide
- Deacetyl Baccatin
- Cetirizine Dihydrochloride
- Nimesulide
- Phenylpropanolamine
- Phenylpropanolamine Hydrochloride
- Reserpine
- Phenylephrine
- Phenylephrine Hydrochloride
- Artensunate
- Amodiaquine HCL
- Amodiaquine Base
- Quinine
- Quinine Bisulphate
- Quinine Dihydrochloride
- DihydroArtemisinin
- Primaquine Phosphate
- Piperazine Citrate
- Yohimbine Hydrochloride
- Deacetyl Baccatin
- Hyoscine Butyl Bromide
- Bifonazole
- Levo Cetirizine
- Digoxin
- Thio Colchicoside
- Phenylpropanolamine HCL
- Colchicine
- Aceclofenac
- Phenylephrine HCL
- Propyphenazone


  Arteether

Artemisia has been used by chinese herbalists for more than a thousand years in the treatment of many illnesses, such as skin diseases and malaria. The earliest record dates back to 200 bc , in the "fifty two prescriptions" unearthed from the mawangdui han dynasty tombs. Its antimalarial application was first described in zhouhou beji fang ("the handbook of prescriptions for emergencies"), edited in the middle of fourth century by ge hong. In the 1960s a research program was set up by the chinese army to find an adequate treatment for malaria.


  Artensunate

Artemisinin is under early research and testing for treatment of cancer, primarily by researchers at the university of washington. [5][6] artemisinin has a peroxide lactone group in its structure. It is thought that when the peroxide comes into contact with high iron concentrations (common in cancerous cells), the molecule becomes unstable and releases reactive oxygen species. It has been shown to reduce angiogenesis and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in some tissue cultures.


  Amodiaquine

Amodiaquine (trade names camoquin, flavoquine) is a 4-aminoquinoline compound related to chloroquine, used as an antimalarial and anti-inflammatory agent.

Amodiaquine has been shown to be more effective than chloroquine in treating crpf (chloroquine-resistant plasmodium falciparum) malaria infections and may afford more protection than chloroquine when used as weekly prophylaxis. Amodiaquine, like chloroquine, is generally well tolerated. Although licensed, this drug is not marketed in the united states but is widely available in africa. Its use, therefore, is probably more practicable in long-term visitors and persons who will reside in africa.


  Amodiaquine HCL

Amodiaquine has been shown to be more effective than chloroquine in treating CRPF (chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum) malaria infections and may afford more protection than chloroquine when used as weekly prophylaxis. Amodiaquine, like chloroquine, is generally well tolerated. Although licensed, this drug is not marketed in the United States but is widely available in Africa. Its use, therefore, is probably more practicable in long-term visitors and persons who will reside in Africa.


  Amodiaquine Hydrochloride

Amodiaquine has been shown to be more effective than chloroquine in treating CRPF (chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum) malaria infections and may afford more protection than chloroquine when used as weekly prophylaxis. Amodiaquine, like chloroquine, is generally well tolerated. Although licensed, this drug is not marketed in the United States but is widely available in Africa. Its use, therefore, is probably more practicable in long-term visitors and persons who will reside in Africa.



  Amodiaquine Base

Artemisinin is under early research and testing for treatment of cancer, primarily by researchers at the University of Washington. Artemisinin has a peroxide lactone group in its structure. It is thought that when the peroxide comes into contact with high iron concentrations (common in cancerous cells), the molecule becomes unstable and releases reactive oxygen species. It has been shown to reduce angiogenesis and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in some tissue cultures.



  Amodiaquine

Amodiaquine (trade names Camoquin, Flavoquine) is a 4-aminoquinoline compound related to chloroquine, used as an antimalarial and anti-inflammatory agent. Amodiaquine has been shown to be more effective than chloroquine in treating CRPF (chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum) malaria infections and may afford more protection than chloroquine when used as weekly prophylaxis. Amodiaquine, like chloroquine, is generally well tolerated.



  Quinine

Quinine was extracted from the bark of the South American cinchona tree and was isolated and named in 1817 by French researchers Pierre Joseph Pelletier and Joseph Bienaimé Caventou. The name was derived from the original Quechua (Inca) word for the cinchona tree bark, "Quina" or "Quina-Quina", which roughly means "bark of bark" or "holy bark". Prior to 1820, the bark was first dried, ground to a fine powder and then mixed into a liquid (commonly wine) which was then drunk.




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