hydrofluoric acid manufacturers,acid hydrogen fluoride
hydrofluoric acid suppliers,acid hydrogen fluoride manufacturer hydrofluoric acid manufacturers,acid hydrogen fluoride hydrofluoric acid suppliers,acid hydrogen fluoride manufacturer
benzene products exporters, toluene products exporters, benzene products india, benzene, benzene manufacturers



trivenichemical
trivenichemical
sodium fluoride india, sodium bi fluoride, fluoride chemical, sodium silico fluoride, potassium fluoride, potassium fluoborate

Secondary butyl benzene

The skeletal formula of an organic compound is a shorthand representation of its molecular structure. Skeletal formulae are ubiquitous in organic chemistry because they show complicated structures clearly and they are quick and simple to draw.

- Sec-Butylbenzene
- 2-Phenylbutane
- (1-Methylpropyl) Benzene
- Butan-2-Yl Benzene
- 2-Butylbenzene
- Benzene (1-Methylpropyl)
- Benzene, Sec-Butyl


  Sec-Butylbenzene

The term skeletal refers to the carbon skeleton of an organic compound - that is, the chains, branches and/or rings of carbon atoms that form the basis of the structure of an organic molecule. The skeleton may have other atoms or groups of atoms bonded to its carbons. Hydrogen is the most common non-carbon atom bonded to carbon and is not explicitly drawn.



  2-Butylbenzene

Atoms are known as hetero atoms and groups of atoms are called functional groups, as they give the molecule a function. Hetero atoms and functional groups are known collectively as substitutes, as they are considered to be a substitute for the hydrogen atom that would be present in the parent hydrocarbon of the organic compound in question.



  2-Phenylbutane

In standard chemical formulae, carbon atoms are represented by the symbol C and hydrogen atoms by the symbol H. In skeletal formulae, the location of carbon atoms, and hydrogen atoms bonded to carbon, are not denoted by the symbols C and H, but are implicit. Carbon atoms are implied to exist at each vertex. Carbon atoms are assumed to have four covalent bonds to them, so the number of hydrogen atoms attached to a particular carbon atom can be deduced by subtracting from four the number of bonds drawn to that carbon.



  Benzene (1-Methylpropyl)

Hydrogen atoms bonded to non-carbon atoms are drawn explicitly. In ethanol, C2H5OH, for instance, the hydrogen atom bonded to oxygen is denoted by the symbol H, whereas the hydrogen bonded to carbon atoms are not shown directly. Lines representing hetero atom-hydrogen bonds are usually omitted for clarity and compactness, so a functional group like the hydroxyl group is most often written −OH instead of −O−H. These bonds are sometimes drawn out in full in order to accentuate their presence when they participate in reaction mechanisms.



  (1-Methylpropyl) Benzene

Two atoms can be bonded by sharing more than one pair of electrons. The common bonds to carbon are single, double and triple bonds. Single bonds are most common and are represented by a single, solid line between two atoms in a skeletal formula. Double bonds are denoted by two parallel lines, and triple bonds are shown by three parallel lines.



  Benzene, Sec-Butyl

Two atoms can be bonded by sharing more than one pair of electrons. The common bonds to carbon are single, double and triple bonds. Single bonds are most common and are represented by a single, solid line between two atoms in a skeletal formula. Double bonds are denoted by two parallel lines, and triple bonds are shown by three parallel lines.



  Butan-2-Yl Benzene

The term skeletal refers to the carbon skeleton of an organic compound - that is, the chains, branches and/or rings of carbon atoms that form the basis of the structure of an organic molecule. The skeleton may have other atoms or groups of atoms bonded to its carbons. Hydrogen is the most common non-carbon atom bonded to carbon and is not explicitly drawn.




CHEMICALS BY ALPHABET